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Archive for the ‘General News & Events’ Category


Solution to Hong Kong’s current Political Quagmire

Wednesday, November 13th, 2019

Hong Kong has been descended into chaos and the crisis is deepening with every passing day  and there does not seem to be an end in sight. Carrie Lam single-handedly created this mess by announcing on the 10th June 2019 that she would push through the contraversial extradition bill even though 1 million people took to the streets on the 9th June, 2019. Just yesterday, she announced on 12 November 2019 that it was "wishful thinking" that the protesters will get any of their 5 demands. Her popularity rating is now at 20 and is the lowest that any chief executive has ever been able to achieve. 

Beijing cannot back down now after 25 weeks of unrest because the communist party do not want to appear weak before its people nor to International political watchers; especially when there is an ongoing trade war with the US. The protesters and the police have been battling it out for 25 weeks with a few deaths already and over 3,000 people arrested; so the protesters' are obviously livid and will not back down until their 5 demands are met. The police will not back down now either nor will it allow the government to conduct an independent inquiry.  All sides have suffered too much and there is too proverbial water under the bridge thus the situation has escalated to a level that is very hard for any side to back down. The events have overtaken the administration and evidently Carrie Lam’s government does not have the experience nor the political ability to deal with this crisis.

As an observer of the events unravelling I see with clarity why the crisis is deepening and why Carrie Lam’s administration is woefully incapable of handling the situation. Let us look at her background, she has been a civil servant for the last 40 years with little experience in PR, little contact with the working class and therefore little knowledge of  what life is like at the bottom. 40 years in civil service has left her extremely bureaucratic and must observe with exactitude a process before a decision can be made; her secretary would form a committee, contact each member to arrange a meeting, create an agenda for the meeting, have the meeting and a few resolutions are made, minute the meeting and then perhaps second meeting to finalise the strategy and then get the PR to draft the speech and then the communication is made. This whole process may take 6 weeks. Meanwhile the protests are unravelling at a staggering speed with fluidity that flows like water; one minute they flow to Wong Tai Sin and the next they are in Sai Wan Ho; so everything that Carrie Lam’s administration is responding to is 6 weeks too late. Unfortunately for her, she likes to surround herself with yes men and sycophants who do what she tells them and any voice of dissent will be quickly stamped out.  

The protesters have lost a comrade recently who fell off a parking lot and they are demanding a full investigation and condemnation of the police violence by the university chancellor. So far, neither of these demands have happened. The protesters are becoming ever more radical and they must be appeased otherwise the situation will only get worse before it gets better.

Given this complex web of interest groups each with their own agenda, demands and bottom lines, the situation is becoming increasingly more difficult to untangle with each passing day so what is the solution? What we need now is time. Time to slow down. Time to think. Time to put place strategies to deal with the unrest. Time to heal. We don't have time. And events occurring at an extremely fast pace time is what the government does not have. Although I would like to see it but the only solution is for Carrie Lam to commit suicide; if she commits suicide then it would allow Beijing to find a replacement without losing face domestically or internationally; it would cause the protesters to rejoice and also remove a person from whom they can make their 5 demands so whilst a chief executive is being sought they would probably quieten down giving the government precious time to regroup and re-strategise. Unfortunately, the situation has reached a political impasse and the only way out is for Carrie Lam to be the sacrifical "Lam". 

  

Third Runway Yes, Its Price Tag No

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Hong Kong needs a third runway and everyone can agree that it can help the economy.  The price tag of HK$ 130+ billion for building it is just insane.  Frankfurt airport managed to build a runway recently and it cost them HK$ 10 billion all in - why should it take us 13x that amount. Frankfurt has a minimum wage level that is higher than Hong Kong.

I think the government should offer a break down for that HK$ 136 billion before we should even consider this option further.

39 Conduit Road - Transparent or Not?

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Henderson Land announced in October 2009 that 24 flats at their newly developed residential site on 39 Conduit Road had just been sold and one of them for a record of over HK$ 70,000/sq. ft..

Until today 29 March, 2010 - only 1 of the 24 transactions have completed, the remainder are yet to be completed. The Development Bureau’s 25 March press release is as follows:-

With regard to the transactions of 24 units of "39 Conduit Road", a
Government spokesman said today (March 25) that the Lands Department had
received the reply to its inquiries from companies of the Henderson Land
Development Co Ltd (the Companies) yesterday (March 24). "The Companies
replied that they had entered into a verbal agreement with the 24
purchasers to extend the completion of the sale and purchase for a period
of between two to four months, therefore no assignment had been executed or
delivered to the Land Registry for registration. Also, the Companies said
that the completion of the sales might be further extended," the spokesman
said. "Given that the Companies had entered into new agreements with
the purchasers verbally and could not be definite about whether the
transactions could eventually be completed, the Lands Department issued
another letter to the Companies today (March 25) requesting further
information. "We will continue to closely monitor whether the
transactions will eventually be completed and whether there is any
anomaly."

In normal sales and purchase of properties, the buyer and seller enter into agreement in writing and the buyer usually pays a deposit to guarantee the purchase and if the buyer fails to complete then he/she will forfeit the deposit paid and if the seller fails to complete then the seller has to return the deposit to the buyer and pay a compensation fee equivalent to the deposit. It is peculiar that no deposits have been forfeited for these transactions and furthermore the standard completion period is 2 months and it seems peculiar that Henderson should only negotiate the extension for completion when pressured by the government to provide answers 5 months after the buyers and Henderson Land entered into contract.

Moreover, it seems peculiar that all 24 buyers bought using British Virgin Island companies or other vehicles whose buyers cannot be looked up, so the identity of the buyers are to-date unknown.

Lastly, according to information from the Companies Registry, different shell companies were used to buy the 24 units. All of them used the same law firm, Lo & Lo Solicitors, also registered in the British Virgin Islands.

Drug Test will not Solve Problems

Friday, August 21st, 2009

Carrying out drug tests on pupils is a reactionary and token gesture whose main purpose seems to be to show the public that the government is doing something about current drug issues rather than to genuinely reduce drug problems at schools.

Our youth take drugs for a number of reasons; some cannot see a future in their lives, some have family issues and their family unit is disrupted and some just don't experience the love that they should enjoy whilst growing up. The government should try to address these issues rather than take the easy route of conducting drug tests.

Initiatives the government could consider include giving aid to single parents, allocate land and other resources for the development of sports centres for young people, develop environments to give kids a platform to be creative and develop an arts and cultural hub that doesn't contain yet another monstrous shopping mall designed to line the pockets of property developers with more money.

The youth today are our tomorrow and if the government does not invest in and nurture them then our future is doomed.

Owner Ng Yuet-Yee ordered to pay HK$ 386,000 for canopy Collapse

Saturday, November 22nd, 2008

On 1 August 1994, there was an building in Aberdeen, Albert House, whose canopy and illegal fish tank collapsed killing one 80-year-old woman and injured 12.

In 1997, an individual called Ng Yuet-Yee bought an apartment in that building.

In November 2008, judge Stephen Chow Siu-Hung ordered that Ms Ng has to pay a share of the compensation even though she bought the apartment three years after the accident.

This house believes that the sentence is completely unfair and absolutely absurd. The fact that she bought the apartment 3 years after the accident means by default that she has absolutely nothing to do with the accident- therefore how on earth should she be liable for the payment of the compensation?

Surely, only the owners of the building whilst the accident occured should be liable for compensation payments?

Obscene Photos of Hong Kong Celebrities

Monday, February 11th, 2008

First and foremost, it’s unfortunate for the celebrities that the photos were leaked… I guess Edison Chen gets off on taking photos of his conquests and it just backfired… 

However, the police are completely out of line in the way they handled the situation; denying bail to an arrested person who did just about the same thing as about thousands upon thousands of other Internet users…. unfortuantely the legislation in Hong Kong and many other places just does not cover these areas and the police cannot invent laws because of the pressure they are receiving from the victims… any thoughts?

2 Found Dead at Grand Hyatt

Wednesday, November 14th, 2007

Anymore updates on the 2 people who died at the Grand Hyatt in Hong Kong? I heard that the 2 who died were businessmen staying over and they were found dead in their suits.

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